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Written by Jane Kellogg Murray

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What’s better than enjoying a nice summer day watching baseball? Watching the game while floating in a lazy river, perhaps. The Frisco RoughRiders are set to host this year’s Texas League All-Star Game at Dr Pepper Ballpark on June 27—pitting teams from the league’s North and South divisions, comprised of the top prospects from the Texas Rangers, Houston Astros, the Kansas City Royals, and five other Major League Baseball teams. The game will mark the third time Frisco has hosted after welcoming sellout crowds of more than 10,000 fans for the event in 2005 and 2009. But this time, the ballpark offers a new amenity: the opportunity to watch the action from a cool vantage point—from an inner tube floating in the stadium’s new $1.5 million Choctaw Lazy River. The 3,000 square foot pool, just beyond right field, is shaped like a figure eight with a gentle current and holds more than 68,000 gallons of water. It’s a whole new ballgame.

 

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For such a small town—a 2010 census revealed just 90 full-time residents—Round Top is home to an unlikely music series. Every summer since 1971, the Round Top Music Festival has curated a world-class series of classical concerts, considered one of the most well-curated music festivals in the nation, housed since 2007 in the acoustically stunning Festival Concert Hall. This year, 90 applicants were accepted to perform the six-week program (June 4–July 16) out of hundreds of applicants from more than 23 countries, including Belgium, Brazil, Nigeria, Japan, and Finland. And each week, the orchestra will train with guest conductors hailing from across the globe as well—China, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Israel, Serbia, and Austria in addition to the United States. The worldly festival owes its existence to founder and artistic director James Dick, who will perform Beethoven’s “Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano” on June 10 and Chopin’s “Concerto No. 1” on July 15.

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Lockhart’s Chisholm Trail Roundup is a western weekend 45 years in the making. The city’s largest annual festival attracts some 30,000 people each year on the second weekend of June for this cowboy celebration, which falls on June 8-10 this year. Visitors are encouraged to dust off their cowboy hats and put on their boots to get in the spirit for the events, which includes a full rodeo, a grand parade, gunfight reenactments, cowboy breakfasts, and live music from the Bellamy Brothers, Reckless Kelly, Nathan Colt Young, and Justin Trevino. And seeing as it’s set in the Barbecue Capital of Texas, the festivities wouldn’t be complete without a cook-off, June 2-3

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We’ve curated a weekend itinerary of the state’s best festivals, concerts, and cuisine—from taco showdowns at Austin Food + Wine Fest to glittering carnivals and parades during the final weekend of Fiesta San Antonio.

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The weekend's best bets include Fiesta San Antonio, the 30th annual Old Settler's Music Festival in Driftwood, and La Porte's San Jacinto Day Festival and Battle Reenactment.

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On the hunt for good things to do this long weekend? Hop around the state to see new art exhibits like “Zimsculpt” at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, and Easter festivities like the one at the Sauer-Beckmann Living History Farm in Stonewall.

Strawberry Festival photo by Kevin StillmanSee more of the Lone Star State as April events kick into high gear.

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May marks the 30th year of music, crafts, culture, and Texas history at the General Sam Houston Folk Festival. On May 12–14, 2017 in Huntsville, the Sam Houston Memorial Museum’s 15 acres will be transformed into a bustling frontier settlement, where visitors can stroll the grounds and experience what it might have been like for Sam and Margaret Houston when they retired there—where he died before the end of the American Civil War. The folk festival celebrates his legacy with historical reenactments, live music and dance, and kids’ games. Festival admission includes the 18th annual Texas State Knife and Tomahawk championship, held on the memorial museum’s grounds. 

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The oldest and largest of its kind in the nation, the Tejano Conjunto Festival celebrates the style of this unique Mexi­can dance music. The genre was born in south Texas at the end of the 19th century after German and East European settlers brought their accordions, waltzes and polkas to the region. The blend of cultures eventually evolved into tejano conjunto, where four-piece bands entertain the masses with the sounds of a button accordion, a bajo sexto, an electric bass and drums.

This festival brings together as many as 10,000 revelers from all over Texas and across the world for five days of music and dancing at the historic Guadalupe Theater and Rosedale Park in San Antonio. Hosted by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, this year’s festival runs May 24–28, 2017 and will feature star-studded performances by Conjunto Music Hall of Fame award winners. 

Chuckwagonraces57Born out of a desire to keep Texas history and traditions alive, the 1836 Chuckwagon Races draws a crowd of more than 5,000—plus 2,000 horses and mules—each year to Diamond B Ranch in Neches, just outside of Palestine.

The race, which will take place April 21–23 this year, draws competitors from across the country, and the ranch encourages everyone to come early—the site is open for camping a week prior. This is no ordinary camping experience, however; the week offers various frontier-style activities, and motor vehicles are strictly prohibited—traveling around the campsite is limited to horses and wagons. Activities include trail rides, Dutch oven cooking classes, cowboy poetry, barn dances, live music and cowboy church. 

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Some will tell you the Kentucky Derby is the season’s most important sporting event in the South. They are wrong.

For the past two decades, the tiny Austin suburb of Buda has held a must-see display of physicality that draws athletes and fans from across the country. If you’ve never heard of it, it probably flew under your radar—perhaps because the sporting event’s athletes are so short.

On April 29–30, 2017, the town will host the Buda Wiener Dog Races for the 20th year, an annual running of the dachshunds that brings joy to all who witness it and put Buda on the map after Texas lawmakers voted to name it the Wiener Dog Capital of Texas. The event benefits the Buda Lions Club and several children’s charities.

The brilliant, somewhat slow-paced event occurs at a makeshift racetrack in Buda City Park. There are no prequalifying rounds for these canine competitors, so the first day of races means there’s quite a bit of wiggling and sniffing around the course, while others move as quickly as their four stubby legs can take them. Last year, the event added a race category for mixed breeds to compete. “The chiweenies always wanted to run,” says Nancy Handrick of the Lions Club. “They have to have some wiener dog in them, but we gave in. It helped that they’re cute.”

The weekend also features a best-dressed dog contest, a bake-off, barbecue and chili cook-offs, and live music and entertainment. And while the weekend of races culminates in a trophy presentation, every wiener’s a winner—or they are in our book, at least. 

Houston Art Car Parade

Three decades ago, a wacky and wonderful parade first hit Houston’s streets: the Art Car Parade. At the time it featured 40 artfully decorated cars and drew a crowd of around 2,000. Over the years, the parade, organized by the Orange Show, has evolved into a formidable celebration of Houston and the marriage of auto-engineering and free-form artistic design.

On April 6–9, this once-niche event now expects to meet with a crowd of around 250,000 attendees, with about 250 art cars driving in from across the country. The parade has become an annual party the whole city looks forward to, as it shuts down downtown Houston’s Smith Street and City Hall just for the parade route and supporting festivities throughout the weekend.

The celebration this year begins on Thursday with the public unveiling of the 2016 Reagan High School Art Car “Bohemian Rhapsody”—a tribute to the band Queen. On Friday, revelers change into their craziest costumes for a spirited night of fun at the Art Car Ball. The parade itself rolls on Saturday at 2 p.m., and the event wraps up Sunday with an awards ceremony, where a panel of judges grant more than $20,000 in cash prizes. 

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