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Pirate Beach Logo1Avast Ye! LEGOLAND Discovery Center Dallas/Fort Worth plans to launch an interactive waterpark called Pirate Beach.

Published in Blog

Photo courtesy Brad Flowers/© The Ann & Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum

Combining artistry, craftsmanship, and functionality, Japanese samurai armor reflects the valor of the historic warrior class.

Published in EVENTS

Fort Worth is a fine city, with plenty of laid-back charm and style. It’s home to world-class museums, honky tonks and an array of notable dining options.

Published in Blog

In Fort Worth, savvy planners, designers, engineers, and others have stitched together new development, reinvented neighborhoods, and a refurbished city core into an architectural fabric that stretches back more than a century.

Published in TRAVEL

Illustraton by Jonathan Carlson

Who doesn’t love a free weekend? By that I mean a weekend free of chores, meetings, errands, and to-do-list drudgery. If one could take all that leisure time and invest it in a weekend full of low-cost fun, the payoff would be the ultimate budget traveler’s dream. And when it comes to memorable travel, the unexpected freebie or surprisingly inexpensive indulgence often makes for the best experience. I decided to take a look around my hometown for diversions that are priceless without being pricey. The result is this roundup of 10 Fort Worth activities that don’t require deep pockets—each can be had for no more than $10 per person.

Published in TRAVEL

Like fraternal twins with different personalities, the North Texas cities of Dallas and Fort Worth—roughly 30 miles apart by car or train—offer almost everything a traveler could want in an urban vacation, from outdoors adventures to art, history, fine dining, nightlife, and museums.

Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, Dallas

Published in TRAVEL

In the Fort Worth Cultural District, fans of culture, art, and history will find plenty to keep them busy year-round. Here are some upcoming exhibitions to consider on your next trip:

Marsden Hartley Fishermen’s Last Supper, Nova Scotia, 1940-41, Oil on hardboard. Collection Friends of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York, gift from the estate of Roy R. Neuberger

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

The Texas Highways Magazine Readers' Choice Top 40 Travel Destinations

Last fall, we asked Texas Highways readers to share their favorite places in the state for our Texas Top-40 Travel Destinations. And share you did—by phone, email, Facebook, and through many amazingly detailed letters. Thousands of TH readers helped to shape the final list, which we will divulge throughout 2014, Texas Highways’ 40th-anniversary year

Published in TRAVEL

Lanny's Alta Cocina Mexicana yellowtail ceviche. (Photos by J. Griffis Smith)

When I’m traveling I seek out what the locals are feeding the locals, says Jon Bonnell, executive chef and owner of two of Fort Worth’s hottest restaurants, Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine and the new Waters: Bonnell’s Coastal Cuisine. He and Dena Peterson, executive chef of Fort Worth’s Café Modern, the light-infused restaurant at The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, have just served up a special seven-course dinner designed to showcase the Fort Worth culinary scene to a group from all over the United States, including me, from New York City. It has been an evening full of appetizing surprises.

Published in FOOD & DRINK

In the August 2013 issue of Texas Highways, writer Margaret Shakespeare explores Fort Worth’s culinary scene, which as evolved in recent years—like the dining scene in other major cities—to focus more on locally sourced ingredients and global influences. Fort Worth, once (and still!) a great place to find high-quality steaks—now offers diners a range of dining options.

Published in FOOD & DRINK

Fort Worth’s new Woodshed Smokehouse takes wood-fired fare to the next level

An open-air restaurant on the banks of the Trinity River, the Woodshed enchants diners and defies stereotypes (Photo by Kevin Stillman)

By June Naylor

In a town where iconic rib joints such as Angelo’s and Railhead have waiting lines as long as the West Texas sunset, did Fort Worth really need another marquee smokehouse? After a recent visit to celebrity chef Tim Love’s new Woodshed Smokehouse, I can assure you the answer is: you bet.

One step inside the new hotspot perched on the banks of the Trinity River, in shouting distance of TCU and the Fort Worth Zoo, and I realized this wasn’t my grandpa’s barbecue hangout. Spreading over 14,000 square feet and unfolding onto a sprawling deck and patio, the open-air restaurant and bar starts the day with espresso, breakfast tacos stuffed with the smoked meat of the day, and flaky, buttery French pastries. It begins the party at noon with live music, offers thirsty folks a stunning craft-beer assortment and wines on tap, and feeds hungry hordes a heretofore unheard-of feast of smoked meats and vegetables.

Within moments of opening in late January, the Woodshed was overrun with patrons curious about Love’s worldly menu of wood-fired foods. The fourth Fort Worth restaurant opened by Love, whose Lonesome Dove Western Bistro serves everything from rattlesnake sausage to wild boar in the historic Stockyards district, the Woodshed welcomes as many as 1,600 guests per day on busy weekends.

As it turns out, adventurous palates find flavorful gratification in smoked artichoke hearts, kale salad topped with guanciale (pig-jowl bacon), redfish en papillote, pulled goat tacos, and much more.

altOut front, beside the entrance, an orange flag bears an image of the meat you’ll see on the spit. Beef, pork, goat, lamb, venison, or game bird show up in varied preparations, but the purest experience remains eating the meat of the day doused with fresh salsas and tucked inside warm, handmade tortillas, which are crafted on-site as you watch through the kitchen window.

Restauranter-chef Tim Love oversees the preparation of the meat of the day, whether it's wild boar or game bird (Photo by Kevin Stillman)Stacks of pecan, hickory, mesquite, and oak supply the smokers, stoves, and—in cool weather—the heaters scattered over the grounds. On a recent visit, servers darted between kitchen and tables, inside and out, bearing trays laden with sharing plates of brisket-stuffed piquillo peppers and a dip of smoked Lake Michigan whitefish. Jaw-dropping sights included Love emerging from the kitchen manhandling a massive butcher block from which rose a mammoth beef shin that had been braised overnight and then smoked for 16 hours. Enough to feed an army, the tender meat fell away from the giant bone as my group sliced it at the table and then folded it up into those exquisite tortillas, along with a spoonful of borracho beans, fresh ricotta, and the tart kale salad.

Familiar choices appear on the menu as well, with the burger one of the most popular. Love calls it his triple threat, made with chopped beef brisket and prime steak blended with the sausage of the day, topped with watercress, smoked cheddar, and housemade pickles. The kitchen goes through as many as 18 briskets daily, probably because crowds gather on any day that the sun is shining. And when the weather doesn’t cooperate? The staff just pulls down the steel-and-glass garage doors that line the entire south side of the restaurant.

With lively crowds in attendance at nearly all hours, the atmosphere feels much like someone’s backyard cookout, exactly as Love intends. “I like to call it my back-porch food, because it’s stuff I’ve been doing at home for family and friends for a long time,” he says.

What appear to be fleets of cars park via valet in front, but many patrons enter the Woodshed through a gate that opens right onto the running/biking trail that lines the Trinity. Guests pop in for a beer and a bite to eat, and wind up staying for hours. On frequent Saturday mornings, there’s a five-mile charity-benefit run between the Woodshed and the Love Shack (Love’s
burger joint closer to downtown), culminating with free beer and tacos. On other Saturday mornings, a yoga or Pilates class wraps up just in time for a smoked bloody mary. (Love’s version includes three smoked ingredients: tomatoes, olives, and ice.)

Fellow restaurateur Tristan Simon notes that, of all Love’s restaurants, the Woodshed is his favorite. “It’s because of its social spirit and the fact that he has completely updated the smokehouse genre,” he says. “The light and energy of the place are seductive. On a beautiful weekend day, there is not another restaurant in DFW where I would rather be.”

Early on, clientele built easily, with customers returning frequently. Marcelle LeBlanc, who lives nearby and confesses to eating at Woodshed every week since its opening, says, “I love the sophisticat-ed food in a casual environment. And the Woodshed serves a mean cappuccino in the morning.”

Another plus: Love aims to make the Woodshed the most earth-friendly restaurant in town. Utensils and cups are biodegradable, and no beverages come in glass bottles. Perhaps most astounding, no air conditioners will be employed at the Woodshed. Instead, an impressive collection of giant fans and misters take the place of manufactured, refrigerated air. You can trust that the stylishly outfitted Woodshed will keep its customers cool in warm weather—and happily fed year round.

Published in FOOD & DRINK


Like most Texans, I’m no stranger to Big “D.”  However, until recently, the “FW” of the DFW Metroplex was an uncharted frontier. So I set out to spend the day in Dallas’ rustic “cow”-nterpart—Fort Worth.

Published in Daytripper
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