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Food Pecan cmyk

On most days of the week, the various ovens and cooktops at the Texas Pecan Candy Shoppe in Schertz, just north of San Antonio, are hot and running by 5 a.m.

Published in Uncategorised

Who, on Earth, can resist the allure of a full moon? Twelve nights each year, we gaze into the sky as the lunar satellite casts cold light on the planet.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Concordia Cemetery  spans 52 acres just north of Interstate 10 in El Paso. Regarded as one of the most  historic “Old West” cemeteries in the country, Concordia is home to 60,000 burials.Concordia Cemetery in central El Paso doesn’t look like much at first sight. The disparate collection of headstones, crosses, and mausoleums stakes out a 52-acre expanse of dusty desert in the shadows of residential neighborhoods, a carpet wholesale warehouse, and Interstate 10.

Published in History

The Wimberley Community Center displays portions of Winn’s 1950 mural The History of Ranching, including the section above.

The artist, inventor, architect, and teacher Buck Winn first beheld the hills of Wimberley in the late 1930s. Enchanted by the valley’s flowing waters and natural beauty, Winn and his wife, Kitty, bought 1,100 acres about two miles east of the old limestone buildings on Wimberley’s square.

Published in People

58 Camel-Walk2

Doug Baum’s farm outside of Waco looks like most others in Central Texas. There are a few scattered, scrubby mesquite trees, an old windmill from the Axtell Company in Fort Worth, and a maze of barbed wire fencing to separate the donkeys and the goats from the camels.

Published in History

61 Old-Quarter

Among the many good reasons to visit downtown Galveston, one of the more obscure, but best, is a passion for song. As often as four nights a week, savvy aficionados of a distinctive Lone Star State troubadour tradition trek to the Strand Historic District.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

65 FigureThe desert canyonlands formed by the Rio Grande, Devil’s, and Pecos rivers may appear inhospitable to travelers driving west of Del Rio on US 90. Rugged limestone canyons cut through sun-drenched desert plains of thorny brush vegetation like sotol, lechuguilla, yucca, and prickly pear. But to hunter-gatherers some 4,000 years ago, this uninviting territory was a veritable garden.

Published in History

If you’re interested in learning more about the ancient canyon-dwellers and rock art of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands, here are some online resources to get you started:

Published in History

When Houston Businessman Jesse H. Jones approached the federal government for money to help build the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, it took a little ingenuity to get Uncle Sam to open his wallet.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

The log cabin law office at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum in Huntsville offers a glimpse into Houston's 19th-Century work environment.

After crossing the Red River into Texas in December of 1832, Sam Houston’s first stop was the city of Nacogdoches, the gateway to Mexican territory and home to some of the region’s most influential residents.

Published in History

In the Movement Gallery, more than 100 spurs are displayed in an aquarium-like setting.

The late, great Texan Dolph Briscoe Jr. loved his native land as much as anyone who gazed upon the storied walls of the Alamo, beheld the timeless passage of the Rio Grande, or strode both proud and humble beneath a vast Texas sky. Born in Uvalde in 1923 and raised on the 50,000-acre Chupadera Ranch, he served as governor of the state from 1973 to 1979.

Published in CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

The lone star on the ceiling of the Capitol dome is 218 feet above the rotunda's terrazzo floor. (Photos by Will van Overbeek)

Approaching the awe-inspiring Texas Capitol, I always feel a little small—but in a good way.

Published in TRAVEL
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