National Forests in Piney Woods Closing Some Trails, Campsites

National Forests in Piney Woods Closing Some Trails, Campsites

Planning a wilderness escape to the Piney Woods? Consider double-checking the availability of your preferred camping areas and hiking trails—particularly in East Texas’ national forests, which are closing some campsites and trails to ease the financial strain.

Where to See the Most Historic Bat Roost in Texas

Where to See the Most Historic Bat Roost in Texas

On summer nights in the Hill Country, rivers of Mexican free-tail bats stream out of caves and abandoned buildings, spiraling up to hunt in the skies. One colony of bats emerges from a strange, 30-foot-high structure that resembles a church steeple on stilts, with pyramidal shingles, and is visible from a public road in the Kendall County town of Comfort.

Four New Trailheads Lead Hikers to El Paso’s Wild Outdoors

Four New Trailheads Lead Hikers to El Paso’s Wild Outdoors

Four new urban trailheads opened this March in El Paso, providing stunning views and helpful amenities for hikers and mountain bikers trekking from the city’s streets into Franklin Mountains State Park, the largest urban park in the country.

Photographer Captures the Evening Light of Texas’ Blackland Prairie

Photographer Captures the Evening Light of Texas’ Blackland Prairie

On most evenings, as the sun sinks below the horizon in the Blackland Prairie, photographer Andy Sharp is in his aged Honda chasing the light somewhere on a country road or in a small town. Sharp has rambled about for 10 years, since he and his wife moved to Taylor in Williamson County.

Paddling and Floating the Llano River Just Got Easier

Paddling and Floating the Llano River Just Got Easier

The popular Llano River is a state-owned, navigable waterway over 100 miles long, but much of its riverfront property remains in private hands, creating accessibility challenges for anglers and paddlers who want to tackle its meandering course. Texas Parks and Wildlife has made getting onto the river a little easier by introducing four new public access points, with a fifth on the way, all available for fishing, floating, canoeing and kayaking.

Film Tour Focuses on Texas Wildlife, Adventure, and Conservation

Film Tour Focuses on Texas Wildlife, Adventure, and Conservation

Looking to enjoy the Texas outdoors from the comfort of the indoors? Look no further than the Wild Texas Film Tour, which is again rolling across the Lone Star state following its debut in 2017.

The tour showcases short films about Texas wildlife, adventure, and conservation—including the reintroduction of desert bighorn sheep to West Texas, following their elimination from the region more than half a century ago; and a journey on the Rio Grande, the state’s only federally designated wild and scenic river.

Texas Highways Managing Editor Among New Members of the Texas Institute of Letters

Texas Highways Managing Editor Among New Members of the Texas Institute of Letters

The Texas Institute of Letters has spent the past eight decades recognizing the state’s literary achievements. Lone Star pride hit fever pitch in 1936. Amid statewide celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the Texas Revolution, statues, monuments, and commemorative museums were going up everywhere from Huntsville to Alpine and Corpus Christi to Lubbock.

Fort Worth Makes List of ‘Underappreciated’ Cities to Visit

Fort Worth Makes List of ‘Underappreciated’ Cities to Visit

We wouldn’t exactly call Fort Worth “underappreciated.” With its cowboy culture and world-class museums, hotels, and other urban attractions, the state’s fifth-largest city has long been a top destination for Texans looking to cut loose (See 20 Things to Do: Fort Worth).

Find Relics of Rural Justice in Guidebook to Texas’ Tiny Jails

Find Relics of Rural Justice in Guidebook to Texas’ Tiny Jails

Long before the tiny home craze, Texas was home to an abundance of tiny jails. A night in the slammer was never meant to be a lot of fun—but you really didn’t want to find yourself in a Lone Star lockup more than a century ago, as evidenced by the new book The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails by Bryan-based archeologist William E. Moore.

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