March 2019

Gallery: Wildflowers of the Hill Country

April 2, 2019 | By TH Staff

For our March 2019 issue, we sent photographer Theresa DiMenno out to capture spring color in 2018. These are some of our favorite images that we didn’t have room for in the issue.

Photo: Clymer Meadow Preserve

March 1, 2019 | By

With their characteristically droopy petals, Black Samson coneflowers seem ready to turn down for the night as the sun sets on the Clymer Meadow Preserve northwest of Greenville. The preserve protects remnants of the Blackland Prairie, a tallgrass prairie that once stretched from the Texas coast to Canada. Prairies and pastures in North Texas and the plains of the Panhandle provide native habitats for this perennial, which blooms April through July and can also be propagated in gardens.

My Hometown: Artist Lindy Chambers Finds Inspiration Along the Backroads of Bellville

March 1, 2019 | By Cynthia J. Drake

When Lindy Chambers drives along the backroads of her hometown of Bellville, she often pulls over to take photos of dilapidated trailer homes or to collect the detritus that many people would pass off as junk—later to be resurrected in her artwork. A self-taught oil painter and sculptor known for colorful depictions of country life, Chambers moved from Hockley to this historic seat of Austin County about 20 years ago.

Fire Street Pizza Brings Neapolitan Fare to Belton

March 1, 2019 | By Julia Jones

The road to Fire Street Pizza seems more likely to lead to nowhere. As you wind around cedar trees and open, mostly empty ranch land on FM 439 near Belton, you might think you’ve gotten lost. But the red laser-cut sign hanging over the restaurant’s driveway will put hungry travelers at ease: “There’s no place, quite like this place, anywhere near this place, so, this must be the place.”

Ben Milam Whiskey Honors a Texas Revolutionary

March 1, 2019 | By Gene Fowler

Texian revolutionary Ben Milam may not be as famous today as James Bowie, Davy Crockett, and William Barret Travis, but he should be. After all, Milam led the Siege of Bexar in late 1835 that drove Mexican forces out of San Antonio and the Alamo and set the stage for the Republic of Texas to win its independence the following spring. Felled by a sniper, Milam gave his life to the cause.

Bourbon Smash Recipe

March 1, 2019 | By

Marsha Milam describes her Bourbon Smash (see photo, left) cocktail recipe as “delicious, flexible, and forgiving.” Mix one up at home to celebrate Texas Independence Day on March 2—or head to the distillery for its second anniversary bash—and toast to the spirit of Ben Milam and other brave Texas revolutionaries.

Watch Out for Tiny ‘Fairy Shrimp’ on Your Next Hike Up Enchanted Rock

March 1, 2019 | By Heide Brandes

Shallow pools that form after rains on the massive granite dome north of Fredericksburg are among the few places where fairy shrimp are found in Texas. Growing about a centimeter long, the translucent freshwater crustaceans exist on the constant edge of survival, laying eggs that endure the dry season only to hatch when the pools refill with rainwater.

Texas Highways Magazine Celebrates 45 Years of Traveling Texas

March 1, 2019 | By Emily Roberts Stone, Executive Editor

If there’s one thing Texans can agree on, it’s their love of wildflowers. A field of native blooms graced the second-ever cover of Texas Highways, and readers’ enthusiasm for the bluebonnet and its springtime companions hasn’t dampened since.

Small Town Spring Break in Gainesville

March 1, 2019 | By June Naylor

Not every spring break needs to be spent on a beach or skiing down a mountain—just relaxing on an easy road trip rewards you for making it through the first third of the year. The Cooke County seat of Gainesville, sitting just a stone’s throw below the Red River and in quick reach of Dallas and Fort Worth, has recently grown into a delightful burg ideal for whiling away a couple of days. Good shopping, a romp on a lavender farm, and a relaxing stay at a pretty new bed-and-breakfast makes it just the place for a small family reunion, girlfriends trip, or romantic escape—with or without the kids.

Adults Only Spring Break on Distillery Row

March 1, 2019 | By Clayton Maxwell

“It’s called Dripping Springs
for a reason,” says Meryl Sager, the
sparkly-eyed bartender at the Desert Door tasting room as she spoons a glob of honeycomb into the Yaupon Palmer, a sotol-based version of an Arnold Palmer made with yaupon tea. “Everything here is dripping.” Sager’s right. When you drive the back roads around Dripping Springs and Driftwood, you are meandering through Central Texas’ distillery motherland. Although not visible from these pretty, tree-lined roads, barnfulls of stills are near at hand, all bubbling away to create small-batch spirits—
from gin to sotol to whiskey—ready for you to swill, preferably while sitting outdoors on a breezy day with friends. These springs drip the good stuff.

The Adventure Seeker’s Spring Break at McKinney Roughs

March 1, 2019 | By Melissa Gaskill

With 18 miles of hiking trails—
13 of them open to mountain bikes and horses, along with plenty of flora and fauna along the Colorado River—
McKinney Roughs Nature Park lives up to the “nature” in its name. Adding the word “adventure” seems more appropriate though, given the current offerings of zip lining, universal terrain vehicle tours, survival skill classes, and more. All of the above makes this Lower Colorado River Authority property an excellent destination for a family spring break adventure.

Family Friendly Spring Break in San Antonio

March 1, 2019 | By Jen Hamilton Hernández

A San Antonio spring break may conjure images of theme parks and a barge ride along the Paseo del Río, and certainly, those are a few options for family fun, but the city’s new attractions and hidden treasures offer alternative adventures worth exploring. Some are decidedly urban—museums and chef-driven restaurants—while others bring you right into a natural oasis just south of downtown. But all dot the banks of the San Antonio River, the city’s lifeblood for centuries.

4 Alternative Spring Break Trips

March 1, 2019 | By

Say “spring break,” and most of us picture a tourist-packed beach, but there’s a world
of options away from the seashores. We’ve planned four under-the-radar trips for those
ready to seek out experiences beyond the norm … with or without kids in tow.

Photographers Capture Texas’ Spectacular Variety of Wildflowers in Every Region of the State

March 1, 2019 | By

Awed by the spectacular variety of wildflowers throughout Texas, we sent four photographers on a springtime mission across the state. They combed seven distinct regions of Texas, from the shaded forests of the Piney Woods to the mountains and deserts of the Big Bend, from sandy coastal dunes to rolling hills and the vast plains of the Panhandle. The results are as magnificent and diverse as the lands that nurture our abundant blossoms.

A Travel-Loving Mom Shares Her Road Trip Wisdom with Her Teenage Daughter

February 28, 2019 | By Clayton Maxwell

Antiques Roadshow Star Bruce Shackelford’s Eye for Objects Has Taken Him from Abilene to Reality TV

February 28, 2019 | By Matt Joyce

Bruce Shackelford is one of those enviable characters who’s developed a notable career by pursuing his own particular interests. Once dubbed a “scholarly cowboy,” the 65-year-old parlayed his fascination with Native American art, Western history, and horsemanship into a job as the Texas history curator at The Witte Museum, San Antonio’s elegant and enlightening repository of Texas history and culture. He’s also one of only a handful of appraisers to have appeared on every season of PBS’ perennial reality show favorite, Antiques Roadshow. For 23 years, viewers have tuned in to watch Shackelford—who mans the Tribal Art table—and other experts as they appraise the significance and value of antiques and collectibles brought in by the public.

The 50th Anniversary of LBJ’s Return to his Texas Hill Country Ranch

February 28, 2019 | By

Taking the Waters: The Fascinating History of Texas’ Mineral-Water Resorts

February 28, 2019 | By Gene Fowler

Dr. John Sutherland would have died in the Battle of the Alamo had William Travis not dispatched him as a messenger to Gonzales.

Rock Paintings at Hueco Tanks Reveal Clues About Ancient Visitors

February 28, 2019 | By Robyn Ross

At Hueco Tanks, 30 miles northeast of El Paso, four mountains of granite-like rock soar out of the desert landscape. The surface of the rock is covered with huecos—Spanish for hollows—formed through millions of years of erosion. Because the huecos hold water, this oasis has attracted humans for more than….

Class Up Your Look in a Peter Brothers Custom Hat that Brims with History

February 28, 2019 | By Matt Joyce

Willie Dedmon calls himself a walking billboard for Peters Brothers Hats, the historic Fort Worth haberdashery. His collection numbers around 60, with headwear stored in various closets around the house and under his bed. Every day, the 65-year-old retiree dons a hat that fits his mood and attire before making his rounds about town.

Explore the Birthplace of Boogie Woogie Along US 59 in East Texas

February 28, 2019 | By Michael Corcoran

The heavy left hand mimicked the rumble of steam locomotives on iron rails, while the right played melodic cross-rhythms that whistled up and down the tracks. A national craze during World War II, the hard-driving piano style known as boogie woogie set the stage for the musical revolution of rock ’n’ roll.

Gallery: Gulf Coast & South Texas Wildflowers

February 28, 2019 | By TH Staff

For our March 2019 issue, we sent photographer Larry Ditto to capture spring blooms in South Texas and the Gulf Coast. These are some of our favorite images that we didn’t have room for in the issue.

The Daytripper’s Top 5 in Sweetwater

February 27, 2019 | By Chet Garner

Texas is already known for being big. But in our beloved “Big Country,” things are taken to another level. When visiting Sweetwater, the history seems a little richer, the stories a little grander, and the snakes a little longer. If you find yourself in this Big Country town, don’t miss these spots.

In Ennis, Wildflowers Beckon Weekenders in Pursuit of Small-Town Charm

February 19, 2019 | By Allison McNearney

Founded in 1872 by the Houston and Texas Central Railway, Ennis is a product of two pillars of Texas’ 19th-century economy: cotton and the railroad. While Ellis County is no longer a top cotton producer, the railroad still plays a role in connecting Ennis’ thriving manufacturing industry with the world.

Escape the Urban Freeway with a Motorcycle Jaunt Through the Hill Country

February 19, 2019 | By Dale Weisman

After a rainy spell, a sunny Sunday morning window opens up: a perfect day for a Hill Country ride. My motorcycle, a silver BMW sport-touring machine, is ready to roll. Jacket, gloves, and helmet on, I hit the ignition. The engine rumbles to life and warms up. I shift into first gear and ease through Austin’s Zilker Park.

5 Texas Restaurants That Will Change Your Mind About Vegan Food

February 19, 2019 | By Robyn Ross

If the thought of vegan food conjures images of a giant plate of alfalfa sprouts, it’s time to revisit the concept. These days, vegan restaurants in Texas tend more toward soul food than rabbit food, and they use creative stand-ins for beef (protein-rich seitan, made from vital wheat gluten), cheese (soaked and pureed nuts), and pork (the shredded flesh of the giant Asian jackfruit) that can satisfy even die-hard carnivores. While Austin has long been considered the capital of Texas’ vegan scene, other cities now offer stiff competition in the way of veggie-forward, animal-free fare.

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