Traces of Texas

A Christmas Feast for San Antonio’s Newsboys

November 21, 2023 | By Traces of Texas

Thanks to the annual Newsboys’ Christmas Dinner in San Antonio, newsboy Gregorio Cortez was able to delight in a slice of pumpkin pie at the Alamo City’s Gunter Hotel on Dec.

Early 20th Century Anglers Dropped Their Lines in Salado Creek

June 27, 2023 | By Jac Darsnek

The impulse to get away from the grind of daily life is not a new one.

Snake Farms Were Big Business in the 1900s Rio Grande Valley

March 28, 2023 | By Traces of Texas

Nobody knows what compelled Joe Guerrero to make his living handling rattlesnakes. But as this circa 1908 photo shows, that’s exactly what he did while working for Frank B.

A Local Boy’s Pioneering Efforts To Protect the Big Thicket in East Texas

February 28, 2023 | By Traces of Texas

The Big Thicket of Southeast Texas is one of Earth’s most biodiverse regions, home to more than 4,300 documented species of plants, animals, and insects.

A Playful Day at Barton Springs in Austin

January 24, 2023 | By Traces of Texas

In 1837, settler William “Uncle Billy” Barton moved his family to a remote Hill Country creek near its confluence with the Colorado River.

The Curious Historical Trend of Photographing Children in Goat-Drawn Carts

December 29, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Given the ubiquity of cell phones today, it’s hard to believe photographers once carved out a living taking novelty pictures of kids in goat carts.

The Tex-Mex Christmas Tradition of Tamales

November 23, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Stocking up to make tamales for the holidays, Maria Moreno stopped by a San Antonio shop to buy corn husks on Nov.

Finding Isolation on Pinto Canyon Road in West Texas

October 27, 2022 | By Jac Darsnek, Traces of Texas

Even today, Pinto Canyon Road in the Chinati Mountains of far West Texas is a lonely place.

El Paso Artist Tom Lea’s ‘Pass of the North’ Is an Enduring Tribute to His Homeland

August 25, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

El Paso native Tom Lea, born in 1907, wore many hats over his 93 years, among them muralist, illustrator, historian, novelist, and World War II artist correspondent.

A Family Photo Depicts a Blacksmith Shop in Keller

July 28, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

 
With a population of close to 50,000, Keller is now a substantial Dallas-Fort Worth suburb, but it was a small rural community when this photo was taken in about 1915.

Rinsing Wagons in the San Antonio River

June 30, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Though small by Texas standards, the San Antonio River has played an outsized role in the state’s history.

Cockfighting Flourished in Texas in the Early 1900s

May 26, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Cockfighting goes back to ancient times when cultures including the Greeks and Persians pitted roosters against one another for entertainment.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Quanah Parker and Three of His Wives

May 12, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Comanche leader Quanah Parker with three of his eight wives at his “Star House” in what is now Cache, Oklahoma, 1892.

How Prison Labor Helped Build the Texas Capitol in the 1880s

April 28, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Plans were already in the works for a new Texas Capitol when a fire burned its predecessor in 1881.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: An Aerial View of the Astrodome

April 7, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Frank Pasket was in the Coast Guard during the 1960s and was nice enough to send in this amazing picture of himself flying a helicopter over the Astrodome in Houston back in 1965.

Once the Tallest Span in the U.S., the Pecos High Bridge was a Nerve-Wracker

March 24, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Standing 320 feet above the Pecos River, the Pecos High Bridge was the tallest bridge in America when it opened in 1892 to improve the Southern Pacific Railroad’s route between El Paso and San Antonio.

A 1920s Modernist Interpretation of Texas Bluebonnets

February 24, 2022 | By Traces of Texas

Everett Gee Jackson didn’t plan to become an artist. Born in Mexia in 1900, Jackson enrolled at Texas A&M University in 1918 to study architecture.

Remembering the Beaton Hotel of Corsicana’s Oil Boom Days

December 23, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Pappy O’Daniel’s Giant BBQ

December 9, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Former Gov. Wilbert Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel was an iconic Texas character. When he was inaugurated in 1941, he held a giant barbecue at the governor’s mansion in Austin, serving 40,000 pounds of meat.

A Traveling Show Rolls into Small-Town Texas in 1921

November 24, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

A Visual History of Cowboys in Texas

November 17, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Cowboys on Turkey Track Ranch

November 11, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

The iconic Turkey Track Ranch located just north of Amarillo recently went up for sale.

The Old Nighthawk No. 2 in Austin

October 28, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: A Woman and Her Calves

October 21, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Daphne Hatcher sent in this nifty photo of her mom, Hazel Harbison Roehr, mugging for the camera while wearing her dad’s boots, hat, and gun belt, and posing with her calves.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: A Newlywed Couple in Swisher

October 14, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Kim Crumbley graciously shared this 1910 photo of her great-grandparents on their wedding day in Swisher, located in the Panhandle.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Election Day in Eastland

October 7, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Election Day in the North Texas town of Eastland in the early 1890s. This photo was sent in by Janice Chambers.

Sheriff Rufe Jordan Kicks Back with Honey

September 23, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Stude’s Bakery and Confectionery

September 16, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

This picture taken in Houston in about 1890 shows Stude’s Bakery and Confectionery. Alphonse Stude, a prominent businessman and Houston booster, owned the shop.

A Look at Small-Town Texas

August 23, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

A Nocturnal Motorist Stops for Gas at a San Augustine Sinclair Station in 1939

July 29, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Prom Night in Marlin, 1960

July 15, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Bob Caperton kindly sent in this 1960 photo of his wife, first on the lower right, and a group of her friends as they were getting ready to go to what was then called the Junior-Senior Banquet in Marlin.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Women Do the Heavy Lifting in Beaumont, 1943

July 8, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

A woman moves a pole at the International Creosoting Company in Beaumont, 1943. This job had traditionally been done by men, but the absence of the male workforce due to World War II paved the way for women to assume many such jobs.

Boaters Pose in Front of the Marble Falls Around 1900

June 24, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

The History of Juneteenth in Photos

June 18, 2021 | By

The Raising of Galveston After the 1900 Hurricane

May 27, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

175 Years of Fredericksburg in Photos

May 6, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Theodore Roosevelt at the Rough Riders Reunion

April 8, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

President Theodore Roosevelt posed in his tent at a Rough Riders reunion in San Antonio for this 1905 photograph.

A Chili Queen Holds Court in 1904 San Antonio

March 25, 2021 | By Jac Darsnek, Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Dallas Love Field Airport in 1940

March 18, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Fashion models pose with an Oldsmobile Series 70 and a Delta Airlines Lockheed model 10B Electra at the Love Field Airport in Dallas in 1940.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Farmworkers near Neches

March 11, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

A group of migrant farmworkers returns from picking cotton in Mississippi. They were on their way back to the Rio Grande Valley and were in Anderson County near Neches when Russell Lee took this photo in 1939.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: The Panhandle in 1939

February 18, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

When Farm Security Administration photographer Dorothea Lange took this photo north of Amarillo in 1939, it was a (relatively) happy time for most Panhandle residents.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: A Gulf Filling Station in Colorado City

January 21, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

A Gulf filling station in Colorado City circa 1932. These early gravity-fed gas pumps with a clear cylinder on the top were called visible gas pumps.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: A North Texas Trail Ride

January 14, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Every week, Traces of Texas shares one of his vintage photo finds with us.
Taken in Mineral Wells, this photo captures participants in an East Mountain trail ride on June 11, 1901.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Café de la Rosa in San Antonio

January 7, 2021 | By Traces of Texas

Jovita de la Rosa Ortiz, third from right, and her parents Magdaleno and Francisca behind the counter of their café, Café de la Rosa, in San Antonio, circa 1945.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Elvis at the Little Shamrock Cafe

December 17, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Every week, Traces of Texas shares one of his vintage photo finds with us.
“James Hefley kindly shared this remarkable photo of Elvis eating breakfast at the Little Shamrock Cafe in Cleveland, Texas, on September 12, 1957.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Sam Houston’s First Home

December 10, 2020 | By

Sam Houston’s first house in Houston, circa 1890. Renowned naturalist John J. Audubon visited Sam Houston here in 1837, and his account of that visit is colorful and humorous.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Texas Rangers Find Illegal Moonshine Stills

November 26, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Texas Rangers with illegal moonshine stills found near Mexia. Freddie Pryor found this undated photo among his grandmother’s things after she died.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Rebuilding the Anderson Gift Store in Marfa

November 19, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Gail Smith sent in this photograph of her grandfather, W.A. Oatman, rebuilding the Anderson Gift Store after a 1920 fire in downtown Marfa.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Oakland Heights Mansion in Comanche

November 12, 2020 | By Traces of Traces

The old Oakland Heights mansion in Comanche was an elaborate pigeon roost by the time Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee documented it in 1939.

Historic Photos Reveal Texans’ Resilient Spirit

October 29, 2020 | By Jac Darsnek

The Carrasco Sisters Teenage Musical Duo of 1920s Canutillo

October 29, 2020 | By Jac Darsnek, Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Plinky Toepperwein Takes Her Shot

October 8, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

San Antonio’s Plinky Toepperwein was one of the greatest shooters of all time.
Famed female shooter Annie Oakley once told Plinky, “Mrs.

A Not Completely Serious 19th-Century Portrait

September 24, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Freedmen’s First Vote in 1866

September 17, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

An important historical event: the first Anderson County Courthouse on the day of the Freedmen’s First Vote in 1866.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: A Marine in Corpus Christi

September 10, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Marine and his … girlfriend? friend? friend of little sister, who is just out of view? 

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: Sweet Treats in Skidmore

August 27, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Angie Bownds shared this remarkable 1910 photo of Galloway’s “Little Gem Confectionery & Ice Cream Parlor” on 4th Street between Sullivan and Patricio in Skidmore.

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: An East Texas Dogtrot House

August 20, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Traces of Texas reader Kyle Terry submitted this fascinating photo of the L.D. Heath family in 1905.

Let the Transformation of Bartlett Begin

August 19, 2020 | By Jac Darsnek

It’s a thought that has probably occurred to almost every Texan at one point or another. You’ll be out there driving along, going from nowhere to someplace, when you pass through a foundering small town with a tragic downtown area, and you see the abandoned gas stations and empty stores and think …

Traces of Texas: Pautchee & His Relationship to Comanche Chief Quanah Parker

August 4, 2020 | By TH Staff  

Around the 1890s, Pautchee, a Comanche man, sat down to be photographed by Daniel P.

A Small-Town Enthusiast Embarks on the Revitalization of Bartlett in Central Texas

July 30, 2020 | By Jac Darsnek

Robert Zalkin dares to dream small. Beginning in mid-2019, the native of the small town of Liberty, New York, began buying 15 buildings in Bartlett, a once-thriving cotton center 50 miles north of Austin on State Highway 95. He was drawn to Texas because of the welcoming people and economic feasibility of such a project. He intends to enliven the small town by preserving and repurposing its downtown, which he’ll document on Instagram at @downtownbartlett. “I drove through quite a few Texas towns,” Zalkin said, “but when I stepped out onto the red brick streets of Bartlett, it was magical. I felt the old ghosts and knew immediately this was the one.”

Traces of Texas’ Throwback Thursday: The First Public School in Eddy

July 23, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

People gathered outside the first public school in Eddy, Texas.  The school was built in 1885.

A Peaceful Day on the Guadalupe River in Kerrville in 1910

June 25, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Wildflower Photo Contest Winner: Spangled Up In Bluebonnets, 1954-Style

February 27, 2020 | By Traces of Texas

Happy and Carefree Days at the Old Store on Clear Creek

December 27, 2019 | By

Photo: Fort Worth families made the most of this snowy day in January 1889

November 27, 2019 | By

Vintage Photo: Gone Fishing

October 31, 2019 | By

World War I is over, and the Jazz Age is on. Prohibition is the law of the land. Bootleggers are running booze, flappers are pushing social mores, and the Great Depression is brewing. None of that concerns Johnny and James Hayes, though. All they can think about is a giant catfish. Everything about this photo, taken by their father, Dallas Times Herald photographer James (Denny) Hayes, is period-perfect: the knickers, the caps, the cans of worms, and the cane poles. While we don’t know where in Dallas the photo was taken, the city—home to about 200,000 then—was growing rapidly. It’s a Texas that no longer exists, a place of sweet memories. Both boys later became photographers themselves. But on this day, there are fish to be caught, and little else matters.

Traces of Texas Is on a Quest to Preserve the State’s Past Through Photography

October 13, 2019 | By Emily Roberts Stone, Editor in Chief

“Somebody should photograph all this vanishing Texas before it’s forever lost.” What began as a chronicle of one man’s love affair with a state became one of the biggest online communities devoted to the history, people, and culture of the Lone Star State.

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